The Pathogenesis and potential reversibility of intestinal metaplasia - a milestone in gastric carcinogenesis

Authors

  • Jan Drnovšek
  • Matjaž Homan
  • Nina Zidar
  • Lojze Šmid

Abstract

Non-cardia gastric cancer remains a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, despite declining incidence rates in many industrialized countries. The development of intestinal-type gastric cancer occurs through a multistep process in which normal mucosa is sequentially transformed into hyperproliferative epithelium, followed by metaplastic processes leading to carcinogenesis. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is the primary etiological agent that causes chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa, induces atrophic gastritis, and can lead to intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. Both intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia are precancerous lesions, in which gastric cancer is more likely to occur. Atrophic gastritis often improves after eradication of Helicobacter pylori; however, the occurrence of intestinal metaplasia has been traditionally regarded as "the point of no return" in the carcinogenesis sequence. Helicobacter pylori eradication heals non-atrophic chronic gastritis, may lead to regression of atrophic gastritis, and reduces the risk of gastric cancer in patients with these conditions.

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Published

2024-06-10

How to Cite

Drnovšek, J., Homan, M., Zidar, N., & Šmid, L. (2024). The Pathogenesis and potential reversibility of intestinal metaplasia - a milestone in gastric carcinogenesis. Radiology and Oncology, 58(2), 186–195. Retrieved from https://www.radioloncol.com/index.php/ro/article/view/4246

Issue

Section

Review